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The literal translation from German to English of the word "Schutzhund" (protection dog) is really quite misleading. To help acquaint you with this complicated, three level, three phase dog sport, following you will find a simple and condensed explanation of Schutzhund rules, regulations, and the point system used.

Schutzhund originated in Germany as a test for the German Shepherd Dog (GSD) so that breeders could evaluate and pick only the highest quality dogs for their breeding programs. Even today, no German Shepherd or Rottweiler can be bred in Germany without a ZTP, which involves portions of the protection and obedience of Schutzhund

Schutzhund Titles

Schutzhund offers three levels of titles, and there are three phases to each title. One must obtain a passing score in all three phases in order to obtain a title, and be able to advance to the next training level.

The titles are:

  • Sch H I (novice)

  • Sch H II (intermediate)

  • Sch H III (master level)

There is also an advanced tracking degree offered, FH.

The sport is designated for all athletic dogs with correct working abilities and is not restricted to a particular group or breed of dog. Schutzhund is now the fasted growing Dog Sport in North America!

 

Schutzhund Training Phases

For each of the three titles already discussed above, there are three distinct phases: tracking, obedience, and protection.

Tracking

In this phase, the dog must draw from inherited abilities by using his/her nose to find a person's track and discover articles that have been dropped along the way. Depending upon the title sought, all tracks will vary in length, shape and age. Tracking is usually done in dirt or on grass. A perfect score is 100 points, with a minimum of 70 needed to pass.

Obedience

The obedience phase involves numerous and demanding exercises which include heeling on and off leash, a gunfire test, walking through a group of people, motion exercises, recall, a 10-20 minute long down, retrieving, and jumping. A set pattern is demonstrated by the handler from memory (unlike AKC obedience, where the judge calls the pattern for you). A perfect score is 100 points, with 70 needed to pass.

 

Protection

This phase of Schutzhund training is very intricate, advanced, and taught with control in mind. It should not be confused or compared in any way with guard dog or police protection training. A dog competing in the sport of Schutzhund must always prove to have a reliable temperament and must show courage without viciousness. The "bad guy" or "helper" as he is known in the sport always wears protective leather pants and a special sleeve with a burlap cover. The dog is allowed to bite this sleeve and he must bite this in the correct manner. On command, the dog MUST release the bite. A dog will fail if it does not release the bite when commanded to do so. A perfect score is 100 points, with 80 points needed to pass.

Many people view the sport of Schutzhund like preparing for an Olympic Event. One must see their dog as an athlete and learn all the aspects of conditioning, proper diet, and the psychology of it all -- for one's self as well as for the dog.

 

 

Rules as defined by the United Schutzhund Clubs of America

USA Variances from the Following Rules:

The United Schutzhund Clubs of America has requested and received variances form the following rules in some instances. The Board of Directors of USA has also adopted variances of its own accord. The following variances to the preceding rules in effect for all USA trials

1. The waiting period between trials has been reduced from four to two weeks.

2. The limit on the number of dogs to be judged by one judge in one day
   in a Schutzhund trial has been increased from 10 to 12 dogs.

3. All dogs entered in a USA sanctioned trial must pass a test of impartiality.

4. Restrictions limiting participation by physically impaired handlers do
   not apply to USA trials and shows.

General Rules and Regulations

Part A. DEGREE LEVELS

Schutzhund Examination A       SchH A
Begleithunde Examination       B
Schutzhund Examination I       Schl-l I
Schutzhund Examination Il      SchH II
Schutzhund Examination III     SchH III

Part B. REQUIREMENTS

The minimum age requirements for entry into the various degree levels are:

SchH A         18 months
SchH 1           18 months
Schl-l 11        19 months
Schl-l 111       20 months
FH                 16 months
B                    12 months

Evidence of prior achievement of the B title must be presented before entry into SchHI is permitted.

On any given day when one judge is officiating, a maximum of 10 (12 In USA) dogs may be entered in a trial. If the entries exceed this figure, the trial must be extended to another day or other judges must be secured to officiate.

Dogs are only allowed to be exhibited in one Schutzhund degree per scheduled trial. If a dog has been awarded a degree, a four week (two weeks in USA) waiting period must elapse before the dog can be exhibited for the next higher degree. Once a dog has earned a SchH III degree, it is up to the discretion of the handier when he/she wishes to exhibit the dog again. Dogs exhibited in a lower degree examination than actually earned by the dog shall be awarded rankings behind those who earned their degree at the scheduled trial. (This is for awards, trophies, placings, etc.) It is up to the discretion of the handier to repeat a Schutzhund degree without being bound by the waiting period, but not at the same scheduled trial date. It is also not permissible for a handier to participate in two trials on the same day.

Only dogs that appear healthy can be exhibited in a trial. Before being permitted to participate in a trial, each dog must pass a test of impartiality and sureness. The testing of the self confidence will take place during the entire trial. Dogs who fail the test of self confidence or impartiality are to be excused from the trial proceedings. A dog is to be dismissed from the trial, if it demonstrates faulty temperament during the trial even though the initial test for impartiality was positive.

PART C. POINT SCORE AND RATINGS

The highest maximum score in each phase shall be 100 points and therefore the highest point score in all three phases shall be 300 points. A degree can only be awarded if a dog achieves at least 70 points in phases A (tracking) and B (obedience) and at least 80 points in phase C (protection). The following ratings shall be awarded with the corresponding point totals:

Unsatisfactory   0 - 109 points
Insufficient       110 - 219 points
Satisfactory       220 - 239 points
Good                 240 - 269 points
Very Good        270 - 285 points
Excellent            286 - 300 points

Should there be awards presented and in the case of a tie, the dog with the highest point score in phase C should receive the award. Should there still be a tie, the point score in phase B shall prevail.

For a SchH A, the highest possible point score is 200 points. The pass-score in this degree is a minimum of 70 points in phase B and a mini- of 80 points in phase C. The following ratings shall be awarded with the corresponding point totals:

Unsatisfactory   0 - 72 points
Insufficient       73 - 149 points
Satisfactory       150 - 159 points
Good                 160 - 179 points
Very Good        180 - 190 points
Excellent            191 - 200 points

Awards for combativeness including courage and hardness are:

P -- Pronounced (Ausgepraegt)
S -- Satisfactory (Vorhanden)
I -- Insufficient (Nicht Genugend)

PART D. THE CONDUCT OF THE PARTICIPANTS

At the beginning of each trial after being summoned by name, each handler and dog shall report to the judge repeating the handlers as well as the dog's name. The dog must be leashed (unleashed in SchH 111) and is to sit in the basic heel position. The pedigree and registration certificate as well as the scorebook is to be presented to the trial secretary prior to the trial (scorebook only in USA). Should the hosting organization demand a membership or affiliation requirement, then a valid member-ship card must be presented.

Evidence of the prior achievement of a SchH I must be presented before entry into the FH is permitted. Dogs who do not possess the SchH before entry into the FH is permitted to enter for the FH provided they have attained the degree B (Companion Dog). In this case, the awarded title shall have no bearing in regards to breed show or breed survey rules and regulations.

Each participant must follow the instructions of the judge as well as those of the trial committee without any disagreement. The handler must exhibit the dog in a sporty and faultless manner. Ill-natured actions or Poor sportsmanship will lead to expulsion from the trial. The final decision in all cases rests with the presiding judge and the decision of the judge is unchallengeable. A protest is not permitted. In the event anyone is expelled from a trial by the judge or trial secretary, the USA Board of Inquiry will review the situation for further possible disciplinary action.

During the trial, the dog must be exhibited with a choke collar in the neutral position (dead ring). Leather and spike collars are not permitted. The handler may praise the dog only once after each exercise. Body help from the handler is not permitted and if used will be penalized by point deductions.

Handlers that possess physical handicaps that hinder movement of the dog on the left side of the handler can show dogs on the handler's right side. In such cases, the dog and handler will be judged without pre- as long as the performance is analogous to a left heeling dog.

PART E. DUTIES OF THE TRIAL SECRETARY

Before the start of the trial, the trial secretary must inform and show proof to the judge that the necessary permission was attained by the club for the examination The judge will be presented with properly filled out judge's books.

The trial secretary is responsible for securing suitable tracking flelds and that sufficient experienced track layers are available. A sport field sufficiently large for both obedience and protection phases must be available. The secretary is also responsible for providing the necessary one or two experienced helpers with proper protective equipment. 'Me secretary will also assure that all needed equipment is provided and that a group of at least four people is available when needed.

The trial secretary must assure that a proper, orderly completion of the trial is attained. The trial secretary must be at the disposal of the judge at all times. The trial secretary must provide a sufficient number of score sheets and judge's books and make certain they are all properly prepared and completed.

Schutzhund I Tracking

 

Trial Level

Tracklayer

Approx Length (paces)

Age in Minutes

Crosstrack Laid

SchH A

-----

-----

-----

-----

SchH 1

Handler

350 - 400

20

-----

SchH 2

Stranger

600

30

-----

SchH 3

Stranger

800

60

-----

FH 1

Stranger

1000 - 1400

180

After 30 min

FH 2

Stranger

2000

180

30 min
before start

 

Trial
Level

# of
legs

# of
corners

# of
articles

Parts per
Article

Voice
Command

Further
Requirements

SchH A

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

SchH 1

3

2

2

10-10

“Such”

Change of
terrain possible

SchH 2

3

2

2

10-10

“Such”

Change of
terrain possible

SchH 3

5

4

3

7-7-6

“Such”

Change of
terrain possible

FH 1

7

6

4

5-5-5-5

“Such”

Terrain change, path/road, & X-track=required

FH 2

8

7

7

6 x 3
1 x 2

“Such”

As in FH 1

No FH may be laid on a solid snow-cover.

30 minutes after the laying of the FH 1 track, and 30 minutes before starting the dog on the FH 2 track, a second person (who is also a stranger to the dog) will receive a signal from the judge to lay the cross-track, which shall cross the track three times.

Point Allocation in the Tracking Work:

 

Trial Level

Start & 1. leg

1. corner & 2. leg

2. corner & 3. leg

3. corner & 4. leg

4. corner & 5. leg

5. corner & 6. leg

6. corner & 7. leg

7. corner & 8. leg

Article Points

SchH 1

27

27

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

10/10

SchH2

27

27

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

-----

10/10

SchH3

16

16

16

16

16

-----

-----

-----

7/7/6

FH 1

12

12

12

11

11

11

11

-----

5/5/5/5

FH 2

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

6 x 3
1 x 2

1. Suitable Terrain for Tracking:

Meadow grass, plowed fields and forest soil: All natural terrains. Sight-tracking is to be avoided as much as possible.

2. Tracking Articles:

Within any one track, articles different from each other must be used. Their color may not stand out considerably from that of the terrain, and their size may not exceed that of a wallet (billfold).

Materials: Leather, vinyl, fabric, wood.

In SchH 2, 3 and FH the articles are to be given to the track layer(s) far enough in advance so that the track layer(s) can carry the articles on their bodies for at least 30 minutes before laying the tracks.

In SchH 1, the handler uses his/her own articles. Attention should be paid to see that these articles are likewise well-scented.

B: THE LAYING OF THE TRACK:

Before laying the SchH 1 track, the handler must show the articles to the judge. Only the previously described "common-use/household" articles are to be used. The trial judge is responsible for determining the layout of the tracks, and for the instruction of the track layer(s).

The handlers may not be present during the laying of the tracks for SchH 2, 3 and FH. During the laying of the SchH 1 track the dog must remain out of sight.

1. The Starting-Place:

The starting-place is to be marked with a signpost (tracking stake with number mark). It is to be placed in the ground directly to the left of the starting-point, and must remain there throughout the tracking work.

The track layer remains for awhile on the starting-place, and light stepping about on it is permitted.

The track layer then proceeds at a normal pace in the direction prescribed by the judge. Scraping of feet or interruption in pace is not permitted.

After laying the last article, the track layer must proceed a few paces further straight ahead.

2. The Legs of the Track:

The number of track-legs is prescribed in the relevant Trial Level section of the Trial Rules.

3. The Corners:

The corners (about 90) are likewise to be made at a normal pace, during which attention must be paid to make sure that it is possible for the dog to continue tracking directly into the next leg of the track. The continuity of the track is not to be destroyed/disrupted by the making of the corners. Heavy stomping of the corners is not allowed.

4. The Placing of the Articles:

The articles are to be laid on the track, while the track layer is in motion. After laying the last article at the end of the track, the track layer must proceed straight ahead a few paces further.

SchH 1: Article #1 is laid in the middle of either the first or the second leg (handler's choice as to which leg); article #2 at the end of the track.

SchH 2: Article #1 is laid in the middle of the second leg; article #2 at the end of the track.

SchH 3: Article #1 is laid at least 100 paces out (and possibly on the second leg); article #2 at approximately middle of second or third leg of track; article #3 at end of track.

FH 1: Article #1 is laid at least 250 paces out (on 1 st or 2nd leg); articles #2 and #3 are laid on the judge's signal; article #4 at end of the track.

FH 2: The placement of article is determined by the judge.

C: VARIOUS OPTIONS IN THE TRACKING WORK:

The following handling options are permitted in the working out of the track: a) Collar b) Tracking harness c) Free tracking

a) The collar:

The collar may not be used on the choke-ring. The lead (attached to the collar) may be placed over the dog's back, along the side of the dog, or between the fore-legs and/or the hindlegs.

b) The tracking harness

The following types of tracking harness are permitted: The breastharness, and the Bottger-tracking harness.

The tracking line is to be attached to the tracking harness by means of the device (ring, etc.) on the harness that is provided for that purpose, without attaching the line to the collar (except in the case of a 136ttger-harness).

If a Bottger harness is used, the judge must ensure that the bodystrap is not fastened in the area of the dog's sensitive (private) parts.

The use of additional straps is not permitted.

The tracking line must be at least ten meters long. Examination of the line length, the collar and the harness by the judge may take place before the beginning of the trial. Retractable lines are not permiffed.

c) Free tracking

The distance of at least 10 meters between handler and dog must be maintained.

D: WORKING OUT OF THE TRACK/EVALUATION OF THE TRACKING WORK:

After the tracks are laid for SchH 2, 3 and FH, the judge or the trial chairperson will have the handlers draw for their starting positions.

Each handler will report in, in the basic position, with his/her dog ready for tracking, on the laid-out tracking line.

The handler will inform the judge whether the dog will indicate or pick up the articles.

The Start:

The dog is to be brought calmly to the starting point; any forceful influence is to be avoided here.

The setting of the dog onto the track, at the start and after finding the articles, must be done at the dog's location (not from a distance). A certain amount of play in the line must be available to the handler.

The dog is to take the scent at the start calmly and intensively. The taking of the scent must occur without help from the handler (except for the voice command "Such"/"Seek"). The start is not time-dependent.

After successfully taking up the scent, the dog must proceed with tracking behavior appropriate to the working out of the track.

After the 4th unsuccessful start at the beginning, the tracking work is to be terminated.

Exception: The FH rules state that within the first 15 paces after the start, the dog may be restarted only once (subject to deduction of up to 4 points).

Once the dog has taken up the scent and is following it, the handler must remain at the starting point until the dog has reached the end of the tracking line, or until the required distance of 10 meters is reached. Earlier following of the dog is faulty.

Re-starting of the dog further on in the course of the track is not permitted in any trial level.

A restart consists of the handler taking the dog at heel, by the collar or on a shortened line, and again setting the dog onto the track. Tracking Performance:

The dog is to follow the course of the track evenly and intensively with a deep nose. Whether the dog tracks fast or slowly is not a factor in the scoring, so long as the track is worked out intensively, evenly and convincingly.

The tracking line may sag, but this may not result in a substantial shortening of the distance between handler and dog. The line touching the ground is not faulty.

Corners:

The corners are to be worked out closely and confidently. A dog's checking at the corner, to convince himself of the lay of the track, is not faulty so long as he does not leave the track. Close circling at the corner is definitely faulty. After working out the corner, the dog must continue tracking at his regular pace.

Indicating and Picking Up of Articles:

Indicating of articles must be done convincingly, in the direction of the track, and right before the article. Minor crookedness of position is not faulty, but sideways indicating of the article or strong turning around toward the handler is faulty. Articles which are indicated or picked up with strong handler-help are counted as not found.

The indicating of articles may be done standing, sifting, lying down, or by alternating these positions.

Indicating and picking up is faulty.

If the dog picks up articles, he may then stand still, sit, or come to the handler. Moving forward with the picked-up article or picking it up while lying down is faulty. If the dog brings the article to the handler, the handler may not move toward the dog.

As soon as the dog has found an article, he must immediately pick it up or indicate it convincingly, without influence from the handler. The handler must drop the line and immediately go to the dog. Found articles are to be shown to the judge by holding them in the hand and raising the arm up high.

The handler must position himself next to the dog while taking delivery of or lifting up of the article.

The dog must remain calmly in the indicating or picking-up position until his handler, standing beside him, restarts him with a short line.

If the dog indicates a false object or interrupts his tracking-work (i.e. by lying down, sitting or standing still), this is faulty and will cause point-deduction.

If, on command from the handler, the dog continues to work at the 10-meter distance, only 2 points will be deducted, and it will not be counted as a false indication. If the handler goes to the dog, it will be counted as a false indication and penalized by a 4-point deduction.

Leaving the Track:

If the dog goes to leave the track and the handler restrains him from doing so, the judge will instruct the handler to follow the dog. The handler must obey this instruction. The tracking-work is to be terminated if the dog leaves the track by more than one line-length (or by more than 10 meters if the dog is free-tracking), or if the handler fails to obey the judge's instruction to follow the dog.

FH cross-track:

The dog may follow the cross-track for up to one line-length (with point loss). The tracking will be terminated if the dog leaves the track by more than one line-length (10 meters if free-tracking).

Wild Game:

If wild game appears during the tracking-work and the dog goes into hunting drive, the handler may give the "Platz" ("Down") command in an effort to bring the dog into obedience. On the judge's signal, the tracking-work will then continue. If this is unsuccessful, the tracking-work is to be terminated.

Praise:

Occasional praise and giving of the command "Such" ("Seek") is permitted in all trial levels.

Reporting-Out:

After completion of the tracking-work, the found articles are to be shown to the judge. It is not permitted to play with or feed the dog between the finding of the last article and the reporting-out procedure.

Reporting-out must be done with the dog in the basic position. Scoring of Tracking Work:

Faulty starting, aimless wandering, frequent circling on the corners, continuous encouragement, incorrect picking up or indicating, and dropping of articles will be penalized up to 4 points.

Repeated starting, strong wandering, tracking with a predominantly high nose, hectic tracking, urinating/ defecating, mouse-catching etc. are penalized up to 8 points.

For articles not found, the prescribed article-points will not be given.

E: TRACKING DOG - LEVEL 2 (FH 2):

1. General:

It is pointed out that Tracking Dog Level 2 (FH 2) represents a type of test which is essentially to be undertaken by sport (civilian) dogs. Special claims (pretenses) which might arise out of the realm of service dog achievements are not to be made.

It is mandatory that the track laying for this test be performed by responsible persons who have undergone a special training (schooling) in the field.

As a rule, the trial judge for this type of test may not accompany the track layer, tracking-diagrams must be drawn by the track layer. The judge must also make sure that the cross-tracks are laid according to the rules Y2 hour before the starttime.

2. Entry Requirements:

It is prerequisite to the taking of this test, that the dog be at least 20 months old and have earned an FH 1 title. Also eligible to enter the FH 2 test are dogs which, prior to their earning the FH 1 title, did not have a SchH 1 title but instead had passed a BH test. In this case, an FH 2 title earned will not constitute a "training title" that meets the requirements of any breeding, showing or K6rung (breed-survey) regulations of a breed-club.

3. Performance in the Tracking Work

Maximum score: 100 points (Voice command: "Such"/"Seek")
-Working of the track = 80 pts -7 articles (6x3,1x2) = 20 pts

The dog must demonstrate his track-sureness on a stranger's track that is at least three hours old and at least 2000 paces long, with seven angles ("corners") that conform to the terrain. At least two of the angles must be acute and one must be an arc (segment of a circle). The track will be crossed at least twice by a fresher stranger-track, at varying points separate from each other.

Along the track, at irregular distances, will be placed seven articles that have been well-scented by the track- layer. The article measurements (maximum) will be: length 10 cm (4"), width 3 cm (1.2"), thickness 1 cm (0.4"). So-called "searchpackets" are not permitted. The articles are to be found by the dog and either indicated or picked up.

Before the start of the track, the handler must report to the judge whether the dog picks up or indicates articles. Doing both together (picking up and indicating), or doing both on the same track, is faulty.

The handler may, at his/her option, track the dog free or on a tracking line. The tracking line may hang loose, so long as the handler does not let it out of his/her hand.

4. Laying of the Track:

The track layer, who is a stranger to the dog, must prepare a terrain-sketch for the judge. The course of the track is to be planned in advance with the judge or with the appointed tracking chairperson, utilizing natural landmarks such as lonestanding trees, power poles, shed s/cottages/outbuildings etc.

Before laying the track, the track layer will show the required tracking articles to the judge/tracking chairperson. The track layer must have carried the articles on his person for at least 30 minutes, in order to scent them well. The articles may not exceed the above-stated dimensions, and they must not differ markedly in their color from the surrounding terrain.

The start of the track is located within a surface area of 20 x 20 meters, in which only the track layer has entered. Entry into this area by any third party is to be prevented. The track layer will place in the ground, 20 paces apart, two markingstakes, between which is the "starting-line". From either the starting-line or from one of the two stakes, the track layer goes out and lays down an "identification article". This article marks the true start of the track. The "identification article" is of a similar size and composition as the other articles on the track, but it is not counted in the scoring.

Once the track layer has laid down the "identification article", he must remain standing on that spot for a brief period of time. The track will then be laid at a normal pace.

The articles are to be laid on the track at irregular distances. The first article must be placed at least 250 paces from the starting-point. The seventh (last) article is laid at the end of the track. Articles must not be laid at corners (angles) or in the immediate vicinity thereof. They must not be laid next to the track, but actually an the track. The track layer will indicate on his track-diagram, by placing "X" marks, all of the places where he has laid the articles. Careful attention is to be given to ensure that the track is laid over changing terrain. It must be laid so as to simulate a real situation, therefore any "pre-drawn map or pattern" is to be avoided.

Thirty minutes before the start-time, a second track layer (also a stranger to the dog), by arrangement with and under direction from the primary track layer, will receive the instruction to lay a cross-track that will intersect the primary track at least twice.

5. Working of the Track:

The "start-line" marked by the track layer will be made known to the handler by the judge. But the "start-line" itself does not necessarily establish the direction of the first leg of the track. From the location of the "identification article", the track may proceed straight ahead, right, left or even at an angle. Notice should be taken of the fact that the first leg of the track may not cross the "start-line."

For the searching-out of the "identification article", the handler is free to handle the dog either off-lead or on the tracking line. The time allotted for the dog to locate the "identification article" (= the start-point), determine the direction of the track, and begin working out the track is limited to three minutes. The handler is free to choose the point on the "start-line" at which he will start the dog searching for the "identification article."

The handler may not cross over the "starting-line" until the 10-meter tracking line has run out (or the free-working dog has reached a distance of 10 meters away from the handler). The handler may encourage the dog, during the search for the "identification article", by means of voice and/or hand signals.

If the dog comes onto the track beyond the "identification article" and takes up the tracking-work confidently, the handler must follow the dog. In this case, the tracking work must continue on in the same way the dog began (free or on the tracking line). If the dog finds the "identification article", the handler goes immediately to him and starts him on the working-out of the track. He may first, if necessary, attach a tracking line to the collar or harness.

The dog should be allowed to take up the scent thoroughly at the starting-point. He should be so trained that with no influence from the handler he will calmly and extensively take the scent at the starting-point. Under no circumstances may the handler, with his hand, arouse in the dog the urge to charge ahead forwards. No restarting is permitted.

As soon as the dog begins to track, the handier must stand still and let the 10-meter tracking line glide through his hands. The tracking line, attached either to the collar or to a harness, may be placed over the dog's back, along the dog's side, or between the dog's front and/or hind legs.

The track should be worked out calmly, so that the handler can follow at a normal pace. The handler follows at about a 10-meter distance, which must also be maintained if the dog is tracking free. When the dog comes upon an article, he must immediately pick it up or indicate it convincingly. When picking it up the dog may stand still, sit or come to the handier. If he comes to the handier, the handler may not advance toward him. Proceeding forward with the picked-up article is faulty. Indicating may be done sifting, lying down, standing, or alternating among those positions.

The handler must go to the dog immediately and take the article after raising it in the air to show the judge. The handler praises the dog and immediately lets himcontinue tracking. If the dog, while on the track, comes upon an article that was not placed by the track layer, he may neither pick it up or indicate it. If the dog changes over from the primary track onto the cross-track and follows it for more than one line-length, the tracking-work must be terminated. The judge is permitted to give the handier some positional help whenever the terrain imposes extreme difficulties which the dog cannot overcome (for example large water holes or deep gulleys/trenches, etc.). No points are deducted for this.

The handler is allowed, after consultation with the judge, to interrupt the trackingwork briefly if he believes that he or his dog needs a short pause, on grounds of physical (health) status or weather conditions (i.e. extreme heat). Here also there is no point deduction. The restarting of the dog on the track will not be scored as a "restart" under the meaning prescribed as faulty in the Trial Rulebook. The time taken for such permitted pauses, how-ever, is counted in the total time available to the handler and dog for working out the track.

The handler is allowed, during -a "pause" or at an article, to clean up the dog's head, eyes and nose. For this purpose, he may carry with him during the tracking work a wet cloth or sponge. These items are to be shown to the judge before the start of the tracking-work. Further aids are not permitted.

Any physical help (i.e. jerking on the line) or meaningful verbal help (additional commands to track) are to be refrained from by the handier. If any such help is given, it could lead to termination of the tracking-work.

Scoring:

The maximum 100 points can only be given when a dog works out his track from beginning to end, at a walking pace throughout, and picks up or indicates all seven articles.

All the angles ("corners") must be worked out confidently. The dog may not let himself be influenced by the cross-tracks. Among the first six articles, every one not found will cost 3 points, and the last article if not found will cost 2 points. Picking up in combination or alternation with indicating is faulty. For a falsely picked up or indicated article, 1.5 points will be deducted. For picking up or indicating any objects not placed there by the track layer, 1.5 points will be deducted.

If the handler prevents the dog from leaving the track, the judge will instruct the handler to follow the dog. The tracking-work is terminated if the dog leaves the track by more than one line-length (or by more than 10 meters if free-tracking), or if the handler ignores the judge's instruction to follow the dog.

6. Awarding of the Title "Tracking Dog Level 2" (FH 21):

The training title (degree) FH 2 may only be awarded if the dog attains at least 70 points.

Ratings are as follows:

       0      -      35 points      =      Insufficient   ("U")
       36     -      69 points      =      Faulty ("M")
       70     -      79 points      =      Satisfactory   ("B")
       80     -      89 points      =      Good   ("G")
       90     -      95 points      =      Very Good      ("SG")
       96     -      100 points     =      Excellent      ("V")

Schutzhund I Tracking

 

Trial Level

Heel/lead
commd/pt

Heel/off
cmmd/pt

Sit
cd/p

Down
cd/p

Working
Stand cd/p

Running
Stand cd/p

BH Part 1

Heel 15

Heel 15

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

-----

-----

SchH A

Heel 15

Heel 20

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

-----

-----

SchH 1

Heel 15

Heel 20

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

-----

-----

SchH 2

Heel 10

Heel 15

Heel, Sit 5

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

-----

-----

SchH 3

-----

Heel 10

Heel, Sit 5

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

Heel, Stand, Sit 5

Heel, Stand, Come/Name Heel 10

 

Trial Level

Retrieve Flat cd/pt

Retrieve Jump cd/pt

Retrieve
Wall cd/pt

Send Away
cd/pt

Long Down cd/pt

BH Part 1

-----

-----

-----

-----

Down, Sit 10

SchH A

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

-----

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 1

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

-----

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 2

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 3

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

1.8-meter Scaling Wall: Construction: See diagram sheet. Dumbbells: SchH 1 - for flat retrieve = up to 650 gram SchH 2 - for flat retrieve = I Kg - for I -meter jump = 650 grams - for scaling wall = 650 grams SchH 3 - for flat retrieve = 2 Kg - for 1 -meter jump = 650 grams - for scaling wall = 650 grams The above-described dumbbells, available on the trial grounds, are to be used by all the trial participants. It is not allowed for a handier to spit on the dumbbells. In all the retrieving exercises, the dumbbell may not be placed in the dog's mouth in advance. One Blind: Must be provided for use by SchH 3 handlers while their dogs are on the long down. Pistol and ammunition: Caliber - 6 mm B: PROCEDURE: Reporting-In: At the beginning of each trial section, the handlers must report-in to the trial judge in a sportsmanlike manner. BH and Schedule I and 2: The handler enters the field with his dog on lead and reports-in in the basic position. SchH 3: Handler enters field with his dog heeling free and reports-in in the basic position. Throughout the obedience section, the dog wears a collar and the handier carries the lead with him. Basic Position and Start of Exercises: Every exercise begins and ends in the basic position. The dog sits straight, on the left side and next to his handler, with his right shoulder blade at knee-height. Taking of the basic position is allowed only once per exercise. 123 In the basic position, the handler stands with a sporting posture (straight stance, feet together, at attention). A splay-legged stance is not permitted in any exercise. The ending basic position for one exercise may be used as the beginning basic position for the following exercise. "Development" of the Exercise: From out of the basic position, on the judge's signal, comes the building up of all the obedience exercises, the so-called "development": The handler must show a minimum of 10 paces (max. 15) as the "development" for the following exercises, before the command for the performance of the exercise may be given: -Sit out of Motion -Down out of Motion (SchH 3 in each gait) -Walking Stand -Running Stand -Send-away Basic-position and exercise-development errors must influence the scoring of the individual exercise. Between all the "fronts" and "finishes", as well as between approaching the dog and "picking him up" in the Sit exercise and the Walking Stand, a distinct pause of about 3 seconds is to be observed. A similar pause is to be made during the Long Down exercise, in between returning to the dog and giving the "Sit" command. Between the exercises the dog is to remain free at heel. Breaking formation or playing is not permitted. Handler's Distance from the Dog: The Trial Rulebook prescribes a minimum of 30 paces in those portions where the handler must proceed away from the dog. It is up to the handler to decide if he wants to go further than the prescribed minimum of paces. The judge may stop a handler from distancing himself too far from the dog. Praising: Praising of the dog is allowed after every completed exercise, but only in the basic position. After that, the handler may take a new basic position. Between praising and starting a new exercise (if handler does not take a new basic position), a distinct pause of 3 seconds is to be observed. 123 Voice Commands: The previously described commands are fixed in the Trial Rules. If a dog fails to perform an exercise after three commands are given, the exercise is terminated and no points are given for it. When recalling the dog, the dog's name may be used instead of the command 'Hier" ("Come"). However, use of the dog's name in combination with the command will be counted as a double-command and penalized by a point loss. Penalties for additional commands: 1 st extra command: part exercise rated "satisfactory" 2nd extra command: part exercise rated "faulty" Fronts and Finishes The dog must sit in front fast, close and straight. Upon command, after the required 3-second pause, the dog must take up the ending basic position (go from "front"C: to "finish") fast and close. The dog may perform the "finish" by going around behind the handler or by executing a military (flip) "finish" from in front of the handler. Returning to the dog: The handler may return from the front or by going around behind the dog. C: DESCRIPTION OF EXERCISES Behavior During Change of Pace: Heeling & Exercise "Development" At the command "Fuf&" ("Heel") the dog must always go with the handler happily, attentively and close, with his shoulder blade at knee-height, through all changes of pace, turns, and in the group. During the Heeling on Lead, the lead is held in the left hand and must hang loose. The dog must travel straight next to the handler and, whenever the handler stops, he must automatically sit fast and straight beside the handler. In doing this the dog must remain calm and attentive. At the various changes of pace, the handler must be careful to make distinct changes of speed: Normal walking, fast running (not a sprint), and slow walking. The change of pace from fast into slow must take place without any "normal" transition-steps in between.

Schutzhund I

Phase C - Protection

Scoring: Maximum Score is 100 points.

Search for the Helper            = 5 points
Hold and Bark  (5 + 5)        = 10 points
Attack                                   = 35 points
Pursuit and Hold                   = 50 points

1. Search for the Helper - 5 Points

The helper is to be hidden in a position 40 paces away so that the dog can make searching passes to the right and left or vice versa. The handier and dog must be out of sight while the helper moves into the hiding place. At the request of the judge, the handier releases the dog with the command to "search" (revier or voran) towards the empty hiding place and then towards the helper. The command "here" (hier) can be used along with the dog's name.

2. Hold and Bark - 10 Points (5 + 5)

When the dog reaches the helper the dog should immediately and continuously bark. The dog should not bother the helper by gripping or bumping. The handier is to remain at a distance of approximately 25 paces. After the dog has barked continuously or even if it has not barked during the allotted time, the judge will signal the handier to pick up the dog. The dog must be held securely so that the helper can leave the hiding place.

3. Attack - 35 Points

A helper is directed to proceed to another hiding place at least 50 paces away. Upon direction from the judge, the handler will proceed with the free heeling dog towards the hiding place. The handler is now attacked from the front by the helper who suddenly comes from the hiding place. Contact between the handler and helper is not permitted. The dog must immediately attack and demonstrate a firm grip. The dog will now receive two hits with a flexible padded stick from the helper. It is permissible to place the hits on the dog's thighs, flanks or withers. Encouragement via the voice command 'Mat's a good dog" (so ist brav) is permissible. When requested by the judge, the helper stops the aggression. The dog must independently release the grip upon receiving the command to let go (Aus or Out). The handier, after receiving direction from the judge, will hold the dog by the collar.

4. Pursuit and Hold - 50 Points

The helper makes threatening gestures and runs away in a straight line. After the helper has run approximately 60 paces, the handier sends the dog toward the helper and remains standing still. The judge will request the helper to turn around when the dog is about 30 paces away. Using aggressive and threatening motions, the helper will run toward the dog. When the dog has taken a firm grip, the helper will press the dog briefly without applying stick hits and will then cease the resistance. The dog must independently release the grip upon receiving the command to let go (Aus or Out). After the dog has let go, the handler will remain standing without influencing the dog. Upon signal from the judge, the handier will approach the dog and helper in a normal pace. The handler will order the helper to step back from the dog and order the dog to lay down. The helper will be searched and disarmed before a side transport to the Judge is demonstrated. The dog will be on leash during the transport If the dog has taken a firm grip but does not let go after repeated voice commands to let go, the judge will request the handler to proceed quickly to the dog and pick up the dog. The handler will leave the area with the dog on leash.

The fighting drive including courage and hardness is to be evaluated, as follows:

P - Pronounced (Ausgepraegt -a-)
S - Satisfactory (Vorhanden -vh-)
I - Insufficient (Nicht Genugend -ng-)

The fighting instinct must be analyzed during the entire protection phase to determine the proper evaluation. The pressing of the dog toward the helper and a firm grip are convincing signs of pronounced fighting instinct. Should a dog avoid the stick hits, the dog must immediately become the aggressor again and must independently engage the fight. After the courage test, if the dog returns to the handler or remains in the vicinity of the helper without being intent toward the helper, then in the final analysis, the dog cannot receive the evaluation of pronounced. The pronounced evaluation can only be awarded to dogs with an especially developed, joyful fighting instinct.

Scoring: The helper must wear protective clothing such as a jacket or sleeve for safety. On the heeling toward the hiding place, the dog must remain on the left side of the handler. Forging, moving ahead or the influencing of the dog by the handler are faulty and up to three points can be deducted. After the attack, it is not necessary for the helper to remain motionless. The helper should watch the dog without assuming a threatening posture or making defensive movements. He must cover the body with the protective sleeve and remain quiet whenever the dog is intently guarding.

Only the energetic fighting and firm gripping dog that releases independently after one command to let go can receive a full score. The voice command to let go is permitted only once in each fighting exercise. Dogs who are not under the control of the handler during the righting phase or who let go only via bodily contact by the handler and dogs who fall one fighting exercise cannot pass the test. After the dog has failed in one righting exercise, the protection phase must be discontinued. No point deduction will be made for the dog that alertly circles the helper.

 

Other links of Intrest

  • Wiki Definition
  • The FCI Standard for the Rottweiler Tail states that in the natural condition the tail should be level in extension of the upper line and may be hanging if at ease. Faults for the tail include having the tail set on too high or too low. Eliminating faults for the tail are any tail with a kink, ring tail, or any strong lateral deviation.

    To truly understand and respect the Rottweiler breed you must first take a journey into the past...

    The Rottweiler is a very ancient breed so it is very difficult to pin point where the breed originates from. Some claim the Rottweiler can be traced as far back as 74AD, where ancient Romans kept a type of dog called a roman drover. The drover dog has been depicted as to have Mastiff-type traits such as dependability, ruggedness, hard working, extremely intelligent and profoundly strong guarding instincts.

    During these ancient times Roman Emperors had conquered and invaded many with there massive armies. Thousands strong they needed away to feed there men. Ancient Romans had to rely on food sources such as cattle in order to stay alive so because of there Mastiff-type traits the roman drover easily became the favorite to herd and guard the cattle.

    Since these roman drovers worked so well for the Roman's it was only natural for the Germans to adopt this breed for work themselves...


    The town of Rottweil from where the Rottweiler gets it's name from.

    During the 12th Century Rottweil had a huge boom in the region in culture and economy. This lead to a more secure trade route along the Neckar River for cattle trade and an increase for butchers and the job of roman drover for herding and cart pulling. This boom of economy for the roman drover was enjoyed up until the 19th Century. By this time cattle driving was banned and the use of donkeys for cart pulling was more common place as well as the use of the railroad. The use for the Rottweiler Metzgerhund or butcher dog went into such a sharp decline to the point where it was rumored that Rottweil had only one single Rottweiler bitch left.

    At the start of the 1900's the Rottweiler was starting to be recognized as an individual breed with its own characteristics. The German writer Countess Agar von Hagen described the Rottweiler as...

    "This sturdy helper is loyal, full of good humor, it is kind to children, it makes a definite distinction between service and non service. In private life the dangerous defender become a gentle lamb. Its wise eyes which, can gaze with terrorizing effect, can , to a friend, show a sincere and reliable trustworthy expression. The Rottweiler is not elegant. It is confidently happy with a deep mind, strength is it's nobility"

    In 1901 when dogs where first introduced to police duties the Rottweiler was soon included and became a favorite. With years of co-operation with humans it all ready had the natural abilities needed, the nobility of its character was especially reflected by its loyalty and reliability, diligence and intelligence combined with courage in the face of danger.

    In 1921 there was an agreement to create Allegmeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub ( ADRK ) and in 1924 they published its original stud book which lay to rest much of the confusion and misunderstandings among other clubs and organizations and gave rise to the modern Rottweiler!

    FCI Rottweiler Standard Translator: Mrs. Chris Seidler

    Origin: Germany

    Date of publication of the valid original standard: 16.01.1996

    Utilization: Companion, Security and Working dog

    Classification: FCI Group 2 (Pinscher and Schnauzer type, Molossian type and Swiss Mountain and Cattle dogs) Section 2.1 Molossian type, Mastiff type with working trial.

    Brief historical summary:

    The Rottweiler is considered to be one of the oldest breeds of dog. Its origin goes back to Roman times. These dogs were kept as herder or driving dogs. They marched over the Alps with the Roman legions, protecting the humans and driving their cattle. In the region of Rottweil, these dogs met and mixed with the native dogs in a natural crossing. The main task of the Rottweiler now became the driving and guarding of the herds of cattle and the defence of their masters and their property. This breed acquired its name from the old federal town of Rottweil and was known as the "Rottweil butcher's dog".

    The butchers bred this type of dog purely for performance and usefulness. In due course, a first rate watch and driving dog evolved which could also be used as a draught dog. When, at the beginning of the twentieth century, various breeds were needed for police service, the Rottweiler was amongst those tested. It soon became evident that the breed was highly suitable for the tasks set by police service and therefore they were officially recognized as police dogs in 1910.

    Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a companion, security and working dog.

    General Appearance -

    The Rottweiler is a medium to large size, stalwart dog, neither heavy nor light and neither leggy nor weedy. His correctly proportioned, compact and powerful build leads to the conclusion of great strength, manoeuvrability and endurance.

    Important Proportions -

    The length of the body, measured from the sternum (breast-bone) to the ischiatic tuberosity, should not exceed the height at the withers by, at most, 15 %.

    Behaviour and Character -

    Being good natured, placid and fond of children in basic disposition, he is very devoted, obedient, biddable and eager to work. His appearance is natural and rustic, his behaviour self assured, steady and fearless. He reacts to his surroundings with great alertness.

    Head / Cranial Region -

    Skull: Of medium length, the skull broad between the ears. Forehead line moderately arched as seen from the side. Occipital bone well developed without being conspicious.

    Stop: Well defined.

    Facial Region -

    Nose: Straight nasal bridge, broad at base, moderately tapered. Nose well developed, more broad than round with relatively large nostrils, always black.

    Muzzle: The foreface should appear neither elongated nor shortened in relation to the cranial region.

    Lips: Black, close fitting, corner of the mouth not visible, gum as dark as possible.

    Jaw: Upper and lower jaw strong and broad.

    Cheeks: Zygomatic arches pronounced.

    Teeth: Strong complete dentition (42 teeth) with scissor bite, the upper incisors closely overlapping the lower incisors.

    Eyes: Of medium size, almond shaped, dark brown in colour. Eyelids close fitting.

    Ears: Medium sized, pendant, triangular, wide apart, set on high. The close fitting ears, set well forward, give the impression of a broad skull.

    Neck: Of fair length, well muscled, slightly arched, free from throatiness, without dewlap.

    Body -

    Back: Straight, strong, sturdy.

    Loins: Short, strong and deep.

    Croup: Broad, of medium length, slightly rounded. Neither flat nor falling away.

    Chest: Roomy, broad and deep (approximately 50 % of the shoulder height) with well developed fore-chest and well sprung ribs.

    Belly: Flanks not tucked up.

    Tail: Docked at the first or second joint. In those countries where docking is forbidden by law, the tail may be left in its natural state.

    Limbs -

    Forequarters: Seen from the front, the front legs are straight and not placed too closely to each other. The forearm, seen from the side, looks straight. The slope of the shoulder-blade is about 45 degrees to the horizontal.

    Shoulders: Well laid back.

    Upperarm: Close fitting to the body.

    Forearm: Strongly developed and muscular.

    Pasterns: Slightly springy, strong, not straight.

    Feet: Round, tight and well arched; pads hard; nails short, black and strong.

    Hindquarters: Seen from behind, legs straight and not too close together. When standing free, obtuse angles are formed between the dog's upper thigh and the hip bone, the upper thigh and the lower thigh and the metatarsal.

    Upper thigh: Moderately long, broad and well muscled.

    Lower thigh: Long, strong, broadly muscled at top and sinewy below, merging into sturdy well angulated hocks, not straight.

    Feet: Slightly longer than the front feet. Just as tight. Arched and with strong toes.

    Gait: The Rottweiler is a trotting dog. In movement the back remains firm and relatively stable. Movement harmonious, steady, full of energy and unrestricted, with good stride.

    Skin -

    Skin on the head: Overall tight fitting. When the dog is alert, the forehead may be slightly wrinkled.

    Coat -

    Texture of coat: The coat consists of a top coat and an undercoat. The top coat is of medium length, coarse, dense and flat. The undercoat must not show through the top coat. The hair is a little longer on the buttocks.

    Colour: Black with clearly defined markings of a rich tan on the cheeks, muzzle, throat, chest and legs, as well as over both eyes and under the base of the tail.

    Height and weight -

    Shoulder height for males: is 61 - 68 cm

    61 - 62 cm small

    63 - 64 cm medium height

    65 - 66 cm large = correct height

    67 - 68 cm very large

    Weight males: approximately 50 kg


    Shoulder height for bitches: 56 - 63 cm.

    56 - 57 cm small

    58 - 59 cm medium height

    60 - 61 cm large = correct height

    62 - 63 cm very large

    Weight bitches: approximately 42 kg


    Faults - Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree.

    General Appearance: Light, racy, weedy appearance. Light in bone and muscle.

    Head: Hound-type head. Narrow, light, too short, too long or coarse head. Flat forehead. Lack of stop or too little.

    Foreface: Long or pointed muzzle; split nose; roman nose or dished nose; aquiline nose; pale or spotted nose (butterfly nose).

    Lips: Pendulous, pink or patchy; corner of lips visible.

    Jaws: Narrow lower jaw.

    Cheeks: Strongly protruding cheeks.

    Bite: Pincer bite.

    Ears: Set on too low, heavy, long, slack or turned backwards. Also flying ears or ears not carried symmetrically.


    Eyes: Light, showing how, deep set. Also round eyes.

    Neck: Too long, thin, lacking muscle. Showing dewlap or throaty.


    Body: Too long, too short or too narrow.

    Back: Too long, weak; sway-back or roach back.

    Croup: Croup too sloping, too short, too flat or too long.

    Chest: Flat ribbed or barrel shaped. Lack of spring.

    Tail: Set on too high or too low.

    Forequarters: Narrow or crooked front legs. Steep shoulder placement. Loose or out at elbow. Too long, too short or too straight in upper arm. Weak or straight pasterns. Splayed feet. Too flat or too arched toes. Deformed toes. Light coloured nails.

    Hindquarters: Flat thighs, hocks too close, cow hocks or open hocked. Joints with too little or too much angulation. Dewclaws.

    Skin: Wrinkles on head.

    Coat: Soft, too short or too long. Wavy coat, lack of undercoat.

    Colour: Mismarking. Smudged, not clearly defined markings. Markings which are too spread out.

    Disqualifying Faults -

    General: Marked reversal of sexual type, i.e. feminine dogs or masculine bitches.

    Behaviour: Anxious, shy, cowardly, gun-shy, vicious, excessively suspicious, nervous animals.

    Eyes: Entropion, ectropion, yellow eyes, different coloured eyes.

    Teeth: Overshot or undershot bite, way mouth; missing one incisive tooth, one canine, one premolar and one molar.

    Coat texture: Very long or wavy coat.

    Coat colour: Dogs which do not show the typical Rottweiler colouring or black with tan markings. White markings.

    N.B.: Males must have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

    AAD    Advanced Agility Dog
    AADC     Advanced Agility Dog of Canada
    ABST     Advanced Breed Suitability Test (USRC)
    AD     12.5 mile endurance run
    AD     Agility Dog
    ADC     Agility Dog of Canada
    ADCH      Agility Dog Champion
    ADRK     Allgemeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub, Germany
    AFC     Amateur Field Champion
    AHBA     American Herding Breeds Association
    AIRK     Alliance of Independent Rottweiler Klubs
    AJP     Excellent Jumper with Weaves, Preferred
    AKC     American Kennel Club
    AOM     Award of Merit
    ARV     American Rottweiler Verein
    ATD     Advanced Trial Dog
    AX     Agility Excellent
    AXJ     Excellent Jumper With Weaves
    AXP     Agility Excellent, Preferred

    B     Begleithunde, Advanced Obedience Title, Same as BH
    BAD     Beginners JFF
    BAER     Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response
    BAH     Signifies a Bahamian Title from the BKC
    BBT     Basic Breed Test, no bite work (ARV)
    BH     Begleithunde, Advanced Obedience Title
    BJ     Broad Jump or Bar Jump
    BHP 1     Beginning Schutzhund Equivalent
    BHP 2     Intermediate Schutzhund Equivalent
    BHP 3     Advanced Schutzhund Equivalent
    BIH     Blindenfuhrhund, Blind Leader Dog
    BISA     Awarded Best in Show at an AKC licensed All-Breed conformation show
    BIS     Best In Show
    BISS     Best In Specialty Show
    BKC     Bahamas Kennel Club
    BLH     Blindenfuhrhund, Blind Leader Dog
    B/OB     Breed and Obedience offered at a show or match
    BOB     Best Of Breed
    BOS     Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed
    BOSS     Best of Opposite Sex, Specialty Show
    BOW     Best of Winners, the Best between the winners dog and winners bitch
    BpDH1     Railway Police Dog
    BpDH2     Railway Police Dog Advanced
    BPIS     Best puppy in show
    BS'(yr)     ADRK Bundesieger Show Winner
    BJS'(yr)     ADRK Youth Bundesieger Show Winner
    BST     Breed Suitability Test (USRC)

    CAB 1     Beginning Schutzhund Equivalent Yugoslavia
    CAB 2     Intermediate Schutzhund Equivalent Yugoslavia
    CAB 3     Advanced Schutzhund Equivalent Yugoslavia
    CAFC     Canadian Amateur Field Champion
    CAN     Signifies a Canadian Title
    CAT     Coursing Ability Test
    CC     Coursing Champion
    CD     Companion Dog, Advanced Obedience
    CDX     Companion Dog Excellent
    Cereco 1     Belgium Title
    CERF     Canine Eye Registry Foundation
    CFC     Canadian Field Champion
    CG     Certificate of Gameness
    CGC     Canine Good Citizen
    CH     Conformation Champion
    CHD     Canine Hip Dysplasia
    CKC     Canadian Kennel Club
    CKC     Continental Kennel Club (Not a recognized registry)
    CM     Courser of Merit
    CT     Champion Tracker

    DD     Draft dog (NCA) Working certificates
    DH     Service Dog
    DPH     Service Police Dog
    DJ     Directed Jumping
    DM FH(yr)     Deutsch Meistershaft FH Champion
    DM SchH(yr)     Deutsch Meistershaft Schutzhund Champion
    DPO1     Diensthunde Prufungsordnung, Service Dog Beginning
    DPO2     Diensthunde Prufungsordnung, Service Dog Advanced

    EAC     Elite Standard Agility Title
    EAC-V     Elite Standard Veterans Agility Title
    EAC-JH     Elite Standard Junior Handler Agility Title
    EGC     Elite Gamblers Agility Title
    EGC-V     Elite Gamblers Veterans Agility Title
    EGC-JH     Elite Gamblers Junior Handler Agility Title
    EJC     Elite Jumpers
    EJC-V     Elite Jumpers Veterans
    EJC-JH     Elite Jumpers Junior Handler
    ES(year)     Europa Sieger
    EJS(year)     Europa Youth Sieger

    FC     Field champion
    F.Ch.     Field Champion
    FCI     Federation Cynologique Internationale Organization
    FD     Flyball Dog
    FD     Field Dog
    FDJ     Field Dog Junior
    FDX     Field Dog Excellent
    FDX     Flyball Dog Excellent
    FDCh     Flyball Dog Champion
    FGDCh     Flyball Grand Champion
    FH     Fahrtenhund, Advanced tracking title
    FHA 1, 2 & 3     Austrian title
    FH1     Advanced tracking title
    FH I     Advanced tracking title
    FH II     Most Advanced Tracking Title
    FH2     Most Advanced Tracking Title
    FM     Flyball Master
    FMX     Flyball Master Excellent
    FMCh     Flyball Master Champion

    G     Conformation show Rating of Good
    Games I, II, III     JFF Agility Titles
    GDC9999E99N     GDC Elbow Certification Number
    GDC9999H99N     GDC Hip Certification Number
    Gekort bis (date)    Korung, Advanced Breed Test
    Gekort bis EzA     Korung, Lifetime Breed Test
    GM     Gambler Master Agility Title
    GMHR     Grand Master Hunting Retriever
    Gr. 1 through 4     Conformation Group Placement
    GR.Ch.     Grand Champion (CKC, UKC)

    HC     Herding Champion
    HCH     Herding Champion prefix
    HCT     Herding Capable Tested
    HD     Hip Dysplasia
    HD-, HD+/-, HD+, HD++     European Hip Ratings
    HI     Herding Intermediate
    HIC     Herding Instinct Certified
    HIT     High In Trial
    HITs     Herding Instinct Tested in Sheep
    HITd     Herding Instinct Tested in Ducks
    HITg     Herding Instinct Tested in Goats
    HS     Herding Started
    HT     Herding Tested
    HTD1     Herding Trial Dog, First Level
    HTD2     Herding Trial Dog, Second Level
    HTD3     Herding Trial Dog, Third Level
    HX     Herding Excellent

    IABCA     International All Breed Canine Association Organization
    IAD     Intermediate JFF Agility Title
    IFR Sgr'(yr)     IFR International Show Sieger
    ILP     Indefinite Listing Privilege
    Int. Ch.     International Champion
    Intl. CH.     International Champion
    IPO I     Beginning Level, International Schutzhund Trial Rules
    IPO II     Intermediate Level, International Schutzhund Trial Rules
    IPO III     Advanced Competition Level of IPO
    IWR 1, 2 & 3     IPO Equivalent for Belgium
    IWT 1, 2 & 3     IPO Equivalent for Africa

    JC     Junior Courser
    JE     Junior Earthdog
    JFF     Just For Fun Agility
    JH     Junior Hunter
    JHD     Junior Herd Dog
    JM     Jumpers Master
    JWD     Junior Working Dog
    JWW     Jumpers With Weaves

    KKL I     (Korklasse I) Recommended for breeding
    KKL II     (Korklasse II) Suitable for breeding
    KJS'(yr)     ADRK Klub Sieger Show Youth Winner
    Koerung     Preferred breeding status for 2 years
    Korung     Preferred breeding status for 2 years
    KS'(yr)     ADRK Klub Sieger Show Winner

    LawH     Lawinenhung, Avalanche Dog
    LBST     Lifetime Breed Suitability Test (USRC)
    LCM     Lure Courser of Merit
    LCM2     Lure Courser of Merit 2
    Leg     A qualifying score in obedience
    LP     Listing Privilege
    LS     Leistungszucht, Parents and Grandparents have SchH degrees
    LwH     Lawinenhung, Avalanche Dog

    MACH     Master Agility Champion
    MAD     Master Agility Dog
    MADC     Master Agility Dog of Canada
    MBAD     Mulligan Beginners JFF Agility Title
    ME     Master Earthdog
    MH     Master Hunter
    MHR     Master Hunting Retriever
    MIAD     Mulligan Intermediate JFF Agility Title
    MilDh     Militar Diensthund, Military Service Dog
    MJP     Master Jumper with Weaves, Preferred
    MOTCh     CKC Masters Obedience Trial Champion
    MSAD     Mulligan Superior JFF Agility Title
    MWD     Master Working Dog
    MX     Master Agility Excellent
    MXJ     Master Jumper With Weaves
    MXP     Master Agility Excellent, Preferred

    NA     Novice Agility
    NAC     Novice Standard Agility
    NACA     North American Coursing Association
    NACC     Coursing Champion NACA
    NAC-JH     Novice Standard Junior Handler Agility
    NACM     Courser of Merit
    NAC-V     Novice Standard Veterans Agility
    NADAC     North American Dog Agility Council
    NAFC     National Amateur Field Champion
    NAJ     Novice Jumper With Weaves
    NAP     Novice Agility, Preferred
    NAOFA     North American Open Field Association
    NASA     North American Schutzhund Association
    NATCh     Agility Trial Champion
    NCG-JH     Novice Gamblers Junior Handler Agility
    NFC     National Field Champion Hunting
    NGC     Novice Gamblers Agility
    NGC-V     Novice Gamblers Veterans
    NJC    Novice Jumpers
    NJC-JH     Novice Jumpers Junior Handler
    NJC-V     Novice Jumpers Veterans
    NJP     Novice Jumper with Weaves, Preferred
    NOC     National Obedience Champion
    NS'(yr)     Sieger/Siegerin, Winner of title at National Sieger Show
    NSchHCh'(and yr)     USRC National Schutzhund Champion
    NYS'(year)     Youth Sieger/Siegerin, Winner of title at National Sieger Show

    O     Outstanding, prefixed to Agility Titles
    OA     Open Agility
    OAC     Open Standard Agility Title
    OAC-JH     Open Standard Junior Handler Agility Title
    OAC-V     Open Standard Veterans Agility Title
    OAJ     Open Jumper With Weaves
    OAP     Open Agility, Preferred
    OB     Obedience
    OBS'(year)     Austrian Bundesieger
    OCG-JH     Open Gamblers Junior Handler Agility Title
    OFA     Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
    OGC     Open Gamblers Agility Title
    OGC-V     Open Gamblers Veterans
    OJBS'(year)     Austrian Youth Bundesieger
    OJC     Open Jumpers
    OJC-JH     Open Jumpers Junior Handler
    OJC-V     Open Jumpers Veterans
    OJP     Open Jumper with Weaves, Preferred
    OKS'(year)     Austrian Klub Sieger
    ONYX     Flyball Award
    OS'(year)     Austrian Sieger
    OTCh     Obedience Trial Champion
    OTChX     CKC Obedience Trial Champion Excellent
    OTD     Open Trial Dog Herding
    OVC     The Ontario Veterinary College, Canadian Hip Certification Registration

    PAX     Preferred Agility Champion
    PCD     Pre Companion Dog
    PD     Title from England
    PFP 1 & 2     Police Tracking Dog
    PH     Police Dog
    Pink Papered     Parents & Grand Parents with SchH titles or both parents with a Korung
    PM     Pairs Master Agility Title
    PSP 1, 2 and 3     Polizeischutzhund, Police Protection Dog, Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced
    PT     Pre-trial Tested Herding

    RA     Rally Advanced
    RAE     Rally Advanced Excellent
    RD     Ranch Dog ASCA Herding titles
    RD     Road Dog (DCA) Working certificates
    RDX     Road Dog Excellent (DCA) Working certificates
    RE     Rally Excellent
    RH     Rettungschund, Rescue Dog
    RN     Rally Novice
    RO-9999/99-99     CERF Certification Number
    RO-99999E99F-T     OFA Hip Certification Number
    RO-CA999/99F/P-T     OFA Cardiac Certification Number
    RO-EL9999-T     OFA Elbow Certification Number
    RO-PA99/99/F-T     OFA Patellar Certification Number
    RO-TH9/99F-T     OFA Thyroid Certification Number
    ROF     Retrieve on the Flat
    ROH     Retrieve over the High Jump
    ROM     Register of Merit
    RS'(yr)     Sieger/Siegerin, Winner of Title at Regional Sieger Show
    RTD     Registered Therapy Dog
    RtH     Rettungschund, Rescue Dog
    RYS'(yr)     Youth Sieger/Siegerin, Winner of title at Regional Sieger Show
    RWD     Reserve Winner's Dog
    RWB     Reserve Winner's Bitch

    S     Superior Performance, prefixed to NADAC Agility Titles
    SA     Select Adult Winner
    SAD     Superior JFF Agility Title
    SC     Senior Courser
    SchHA     Obedience and Protection portion of Schutzhund, No tracking
    SchH I     Elementary level Schutzhund title
    SchH1    Elementary level Schutzhund title
    SchH II     Intermediate level Schutzhund title
    SchH2     Intermediate level Schutzhund title
    SchH III     Advanced level Schutzhund title
    SchH3     Advanced level Schutzhund title
    Select     Judges Award of Merit  National Specialty Only
    SG     Sehr Gut - A German rating of Very Good
    SH     Senior Hunter
    SK 1     IPO 1 Equivalent from Finland
    SM     Snooker Master (USDAA) Agility Titles
    SPH     FH Equivalent from Holland
    SR     Started Retriever (NAHRA) Hunt Test Titles
    STD     Started Trial Dog ASCA Herding titles
    SWD     Senior Working Dog (AWSFA) Working certificates
    SY     Select Youth, Winner of title at Club Conformation Show
    SZL 1, 2 & 3     Schutzhund Equivalent from Holland

    TD     Tracking Dog
    TD     Therapy Dog
    TDD    Team draft dog
    TDI     Therapy Dog International
    TDX     Tracking Dog Excellent
    TT     Temperament Tested

    U-AGI     Agility I
    U-AGII     Agility II
    U-ACH    Agility Champion
    U-ACHX     Agility Champion Excellent
    U-CD     Companion Dog (UKC)
    U-CDX     Companion Dog Excellent (UKC)
    U-OTCh     Obedience Trial Champion
    U-UD     Utility Dog (UKC)
    UCI     Union Cynologie International
    UD     Utility Dog
    UDT     Utility Dog title with a Tracking Dog title
    UDTX     Utility Dog title with a Tracking Dog Excellent title
    UDVST     Utility Dog title/Variable Surface Tracking title
    UDX     Utility Dog Excellent
    UKC     United Kennel Club
    USA     United Schutzhund Club of America Organization
    USDAA     United States Dog Agility Association
    USRC     United States Rottweiler Club
    UTD     Urban Tracking Dog
    UTDX     Urban Tracking Dog Excellent

    -V     Veterans suffix to any NADAC Agility Title
    V     Vorzuglich, Excellent Rating at a European style Rottweiler Show
    V-Rated    Vorzuglich, Excellent Rating at a European style Rottweiler Show
    V-1     Excellent Rating First Place Winner at Sieger Show
    V-2     Excellent Rating Second Place Winner at Sieger Show
    V-3     Excellent Rating Third Place Winner at Sieger Show
    V-4     Excellent Rating Fouth Place Winner at Sieger Show
    VAD     Veteran Agility Dog
    VAAD     Veteran Advanced Agility Dog
    VDH     Verband fur das Deutsche Hundewesen
    VG     Veterans Gambler Agility
    VH 1, 2 & 3     Schutzhund Equivalent from Holland
    Vice Sieger     Runner up (Second) to show Sieger Title
    Vice Siegerin     Runner up (Second) to show Siegerin Title
    Vice Youth Sieger     Runner up (Second) to show Youth Sieger Title
    Vice Youth Siegerin     Runner up (Second) to show Youth Siegerin Title
    VJ     Veterans Jumper
    VMAD     Veteran Master Agility Dog
    VPD     Veteran Performance Dog Agility
    VPG I     Elementary level Schutzhund title
    VPG1     Elementary level Schutzhund title
    VPG II     Intermediate level Schutzhund title
    VPG2     Intermediate level Schutzhund title
    VPG III     Advanced level Schutzhund title
    VPG3     Advanced level Schutzhund title
    VS     Veterans Snooker Agility
    VST     Variable Surface Tracking

    WB     Winner's Bitch (takes the points)
    WC     Working Certificate
    WCI     Working Certificate Intermediate
    WCX     Working Certificate Excellent
    WD     Winner's Dog (takes the points)
    WD     Working Dog (AWSC) Working certificates
    WD     Water dog
    WDA     Working Dog Association
    WDQ     working dog qualified
    WDS     Working Dog Superior
    WDX     Working Dog Excellent
    WH     Watchdog
    WR     Working Retriever
    WRD     Water rescue dog (NCA)
    WS'(yr)     World Sieger
    WJS'(yr)     World Youth Sieger
    WTCH     Working Trial Champion-prefix ASCA Herding titles

    ZFH     Customs Tracking Dog
    ZH 1, 2 & 3     Customs Dog
    ZtP     Zuchttanglichkeitsprunfung, Breed Suitability Test
    ZtPr     German breed suitability test, includes measuring weighing & character testing
    ZVV 1, 2, & 3     Schutzhund Equivalent from Hungary, Czech and Poland